Nicholas J. Cutforth

Professor

  • Faculty
  • Morgridge College of Education

What I do

Professor and Department Chair, Research Methods & Information Science.

Professional Biography

Nick Cutforth is Professor in the Research Methods and Statistics Program and Chair of the Department of Research Methods and Information Science in the Morgridge College of Education at the University of Denver. His research focuses on physical activity interventions in low-income schools, community-based research, engaged scholarship and promotion and tenure, and ways in which universities can support junior faculty wanting to establish community-engaged careers. He has consulted on these issues with several universities in the US and UK. He has co-authored two books: Youth Development and Physical Activity: Linking Universities with Communities (Human Kinetics, 2000) and Community-Based Research and Higher Education: Principles and Practices (Jossey-Bass, 2003) and has published over 30 articles in the community-based research, physical education, and public health fields. Nick’s current research is funded by the CDC and the Colorado Health Foundation and involves school-based intervention studies related to physical activity and healthy eating among K-12 students in the San Luis Valley in rural Colorado.

Degree(s)

  • Ph.D., Curriculum, Instruction, and Evaluation, University of Illinois , 1994
  • MS, Physical Education, University of Oregon, 1983
  • BA, Physical Education and Geography., College of St. Paul and St. Mary, 1981

Professional Affiliations

  • American Public Health Association

Research

I have been conducting research with schools and community-based organizations for over 20 years.  My research and teaching interests include school health and physical activity environments, physical activity and youth development, university/community partnerships, and community-based research.  Using fieldwork and applied research methods, my writing focuses on the social consequences of this work, and draws on the belief that the diverse talents of academics, students, educators, and community members can produce excellent research that will strengthen the community as a whole and enhance the relevance of the academy in addressing real world problems.

I have written over 30 articles and book chapters, and co-authored two books: Youth Development and Physical Activity: Linking Universities with Communities (Human Kinetics, 2000) and Community-Based Research and Higher Education: Principles and Practices (Jossey-Bass, 2003). I have supervised over two-dozen community-based research projects with students and faculty colleagues and community partners since 1999.   

My current research involves rural school-based intervention studies related to physical activity and healthy eating among K-12 students in the San Luis Valley and southeast Colorado.  My co-authored grants to build healthy school environments and policies have been funded by the Centers for Disease Control and the Colorado Health Foundation.