Douglas H Clements

Professor

  • Faculty
  • Morgridge College of Education

What I do

Douglas H. Clements, previously a kindergarten teacher for five years and a preschool teacher for one year, has conducted research and published widely in the areas of the learning and teaching of early mathematics and computer applications in mathematics education. His most recent interests are in creating, using, and evaluating a research-based curriculum and in taking successful curricula to scale using technologies and learning trajectories.

Professional Biography

Douglas H. Clements is Distinguished University Professor, Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning, and Executive Director of the Marsico Institute for Early Learning and Literacy at the University of Denver. Previously a kindergarten teacher for five years and a preschool teacher for one year, he has conducted research and published widely in the areas of the learning and teaching of early mathematics and computer applications in mathematics education. His most recent interests are in creating, using, and evaluating a research-based curriculum and in taking successful curricula to scale using technologies and learning trajectories. He has published over 135 refereed research studies, 22 books, 86 chapters, and 300 additional publications. His latest books detail research-based learning trajectories in early mathematics education: Early childhood mathematics education research: Learning trajectories for young children and a companion book, Learning and teaching early math: The learning trajectories approach (Routledge). Dr. Clements has directed over 35 funded projects. Currently, Dr. Clements is Principal Investigator on two large-scale research projects. The first, Longitudinal Study of a Successful Scaling Up Project: Extending TRIAD, follows students the original large-scale TRIAD project from pre-K to fifth grade. The second, Evaluating the Efficacy of Learning Trajectories in Early Mathematics, funded by the U.S. Department of Education’s Institute of Education Sciences (IES) to evaluate the specific benefits of using learning trajectories. The NSF has funded three recent research projects. Clements is PI on the first, Using Rule Space and Poset-based Adaptive Testing Methodologies to Identify Ability Patterns in Early Mathematics and Create a Comprehensive Mathematics Ability Test, which will develop a computer-adaptive assessment for early mathematics. Clements is co-PI on the second, Early Childhood Education in the Context of Mathematics, Science, and Literacy, developing an interdisciplinary preschool curriculum. The third, developing better ways of assessing and teaching geometric measurement, is Learning Trajectories to Support the Growth of Measurement Knowledge: Pre-K through Middle School. Another recent project, just funded by the Heising-Simons Foundation and the Gates Foundation, Scalable Professional Development in Early Mathematics: The Learning and Teaching with Learning Trajectories Tool, is updating and disseminate a professional development software application empirically supported in previous projects. Additional information can be found at http://du.academia.edu/DouglasClements, http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Douglas_Clements/, and http://portfolio.du.edu/dclemen9

Degree(s)

  • Ph.D., Mathematics Education, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, 1983

Licensure / Accreditations

  • Nursery, Kindergarten, and Grades 1-6

Professional Affiliations

  • American Educational Research Association
  • National Council of Teachers of Mathematics
  • Society for Research on Educational Effectiveness
  • National Association for the Educational of Young Children
  • International Group for the Psychology in Mathematics Education